62 Things To Do In Clarington This Summer!

 

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by Clarington Tourism

Click Here for 62 Things To Do In Clarington This Summer!

Want to make your summer super special with memories that will last a lifetime?  Clarington Tourism is here to help!

Enjoy this ‘summer bucket list’ that will keep your happy campers busy each day, and tuckered out at night!

For more ideas on things to do in Clarington,  call, drop in, download our Mobile App, or Follow Us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!

 

 

 

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A Perfect Summer Retreat

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by Meaghan Newey

Archibald’s Orchard & Estate Winery and Cider House Golf is a fourth
generation family farm business located in Bowmanville, Ontario.

Owned and operated by Fred and Sandy Archibald, this 40-acre property is an ideal orchard site with a south-westerly slope for good air and soil drainage. With a number of other local attractions and beautiful surrounding countryside. Originally established in 1967 as a wholesale operation, Fred and Sandy have developed the family farm into several components including pick your own apples, wine tasting and more!

Wednesday June 25, 2014 will mark the 17th anniversary of the Archibald’s Winery. With a wide array of non-alcoholic, ciders and apple blends, you’ll be sure to find the perfect wine for yourself, or as a gift. After all, Archibald’s is Ontario’s leading Fruit Winery.

This summer the estate is introducing it’s Junior Golf Clinic, for ages 6-16, and instructed by Becky MacIntosh. Sandy has asked to please inquire within for more information regarding Junior Golf. http://www.ciderhousegolf.ca

There truly is so much to do at Archibalds’s. Make sure to check back in the fall months for information on weekend events!

Picture3Don’t forget to follow/like Archibald’s on Facebook!

 

This Weekend In Clarington

Thursday December 12th to Sunday December 15th

This is clearly the season of celebration and tradition, but have you checked out some of the NEW changes at Brimacombe Ski Hill lately? Part of our community since 1937, Brimacombe is experiencing exciting new growth with each passing season! We hope you re-visit Clarington in a new way this weekend!

  • Opening Day at Brimacombe Ski Hill – 4098 Regional Road 9, Orono. Saturday, December 14th – It’s official
    Brimacombe will be open for the 2013/14 season! (weather and snow conditions permitting, of course)“When it comes to skiing and snowboarding in the GTA, few will find a better experience than at Brimacombe. Rated “The Best in the Snow Business” by the Canadian Ski Council, Brimacombe caters to the traditional skier as well as the snowboarder who wants to jib all day long in one of our terrain parks. There’s no better way to experience Brimacombe than coming down and hitting the slopes.Below we have listed some of the great features at Brimacombe. We’re always improving our experience… sign up for our e-newsletter to keep tabs on all the exciting things happening at the Brim!”

    Open to members and non-members

    300 Foot Vertical

    21 runs & trails from beginner to expert for day skiing

    11 runs are available for night skiing

    2 Terrain Parks

    100% snowmaking coverage

    4 quad chairs

    5 T-Bars

    Magic Carpet Conveyor Lift®

    2 Chalets with Cafeterias

    Slopeside Retail Store with Tune-Ups and Repairs (Gate 4)

    Equipment Rentals (Gate 4)

    Professional Ski & Snowboard Instruction (Gate 4)

    Pee Wee Ski Camp (Gate 1)

    Radio Equipped Ski Patrol

    Race Program

    Canadian Association for Disabled Skiers

    Social Events – Ski Swap, Open House, Après Ski Parties, Rail Jams, BrimFest and more

    http://www.brimacombe.ca/

  • Jingle Bell Rock – Clarington Public Library Bowmanville Branch, Thursday, December 12, 2013 – 7:00pm.   Join the Clarington Public Library for a holiday story-time and sing-a-long! Listen to classic holiday stories like “Twas the Night Before Christmas” then jingle bell rock out to “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” and many more classic holiday tunes. It will be a rocking good time!  No registration required – drop-in. Families of all ages welcome!

  • http://www.clarington-library.on.ca/node/144
  • The Animals Gift Holiday Performance – The Bowmanville Zoo, 340 King Street East, Bowmanville. Dec 14th & 15th Matinee Performances (throught to Dec 31st)
    “Come celebrate the season with the animals from the Bowmanville Zoo, as they present The Animals Gift. This live theatrical performance is a multicultural event that displays the historical relationship amongst humans and animals throughout this festive period.
    Travel back in time through the holiest of seasons, as seen through the eyes, and felt in the hearts of the animals of our planet. As the world tenderly sleeps, the wild creatures of field and forest come forward to rejoice and celebrate in the wonder of this festive season. Come and share with our animals, their gifts to us. and share with our animals their gifts
    to us.”
  • http://www.theanimalsgift.com/
  • Breakfast with Santa at Tyrone Community Centre on Saturday, December 14th from 10am to 2pm. http://www.tyroneontario.com/category/breakfast-with-santa
  • Tree Hunting in Clarington” – Here is a link via DurhamRegion.com with acres of fresh, local Ontario Christmas Tree Growers in our Municipality –
    http://www.durhamregion.com/news-story/4251861-tips-for-a-successful-durham-christmas-tree-hunt/

Check Back next week for a list FREE SKATES FOR FAMILIES at our local arenas!

Find us on Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/TourismClarington for more event info

Follow us on Twitter  https://twitter.com/clartourism #onlyinClarington

Or, download to our FREE Mobile App, and have all the details available as you travel around Clarington  http://m.clarington-tourism.ca

For more information on events in Clarington, please contact us at 1-855-779-1923, or tourism@clarington.net

This Weekend in Clarington

November 28 to December 1

Before checking out this weekend’s events, get a cuppa and find a comfortable chair – because it’s a long list …..

  • CP Holiday Train at the Scugog/Wellington Streets Crossing, Bowmanville (south side of track). Train arrives at 6:30PM on Thursday, November 28th  www.cpr.ca/en/in-your-community
  • Courtice Christmas Tree Lighting at Whitecliffe Terrace, 1460 Highway 2, Courtice, on Thursday, November 28th at 6:30PM
  • Annual Christmas Open House at Newcastle Home Decor, 80 King Avenue East, Newcastle, on Thursday November 28th from 6 to 9 PM  www.newcastlehomedecor.net
  • Christmas in Clarington Country at various locations in Enniskillen, Bowmanville, Tyrone and Newcastle, from Friday, November 29th to Sunday, December 1st, 10AM to 5PM. http://www.thesprucetree.com/christmasinclarington.html.  Pick up a map of this shopping tour at the Tourism Office, 181 Liberty Street South, Bowmanville
  • Christmas in Newcastle, Open House Event at Health Soaps Bath & Body, 98 Mill Street South, Newcastle, on  Friday, November 29th from 10AM to 11PM  http://www.healthysuds.com/
  • “County West” performs at Trinity United Church, 116 Church Street, Bowmanville, on Friday, November 29th at 7:30PM.  Tickets 905-623-3138
  • Orono Santa Claus Parade, downtown Orono, on Saturday, November 30th starting at 10:30AM  http://visitorono.com
  • Breakfast with Santa, at the Newcastle Community Hall, King Avenue, Newcastle, on Saturday, November 30th from 8AM to11AM http://www.newcastle.on.ca
  • A Country Christmas in Solina at Solina Hall, Concession 6 (Conlin Road) and Solina Road, on Saturday, November 30th from 10AM to 4:30PM http://mamishoppes.blogspot.ca
  • 1st Annual Holiday Sale (proceeds to Clarington Tiger Cats Football Club) at the Garnet Rickard Centre, Saturday, November 30th from 9AM to 6PM. http://claringtontigercats.com
  • First Annual Christmas Open House at Silly Sisters Antique Emporium, 5324 Main Street, Orono, on Saturday November 30th from 10AM to 6PM, and Sunday December 1st, 10AM to 5PM www.sillysistersantiques.com
  • First Annual Christmas Open House at Butternut Mercantile and Coffee Parlour, 5423 Main Street, Orono, on Saturday November 30th from 10AM to 6PM, and Sunday December 1st, 11AM to 5PM  here
  • Christmas Open House at Patriot Antiques, 5283 Main Street, Orono, on Saturday November 30th from 10AM to 5PM www.patriotantiques.net 
  • Christmas Open House, with live entertainment, at the Port of Newcastle Marina.  Call 905-987-5251
  • Christmas with the Alpacas Open House at One Stop Alpacas, 1857 Durham Road 3, Concession Road 8, Enniskillen.  This is the last weekend for the open house – Friday and Saturday, November 29th and 30th from 10AM to 5PM, and Sunday, December 1st from 11AM to 4PM. http://1stopalpacafarm.com
  • Christmas Bazaar and Home Show at Kingsway Arms Clarington Centre, 65 Clarington Boulevard, Bowmanville, on Saturday, November 30th from 9AM to 2PM
  • Lego Mania at the Sarah Jane Williams Heritage Centre, 62 Temperance Street, Bowmanville, Saturday, November 30th from 10AM to noon.  Please call 905-623-2734 to pre-register
  • Sports Day in Canada, includes free activities for the whole family!  Newcastle & District Recreation Complex, 1780 Rudell Road, Newcastle, Saturday, November. 1:30PM to 4:30PM.  Demonstrations, Artist, Fitness Trainers. Free Public Swim  2PM to 4PM with non-perishable food donation.  Call 905-987-5667  2PM to 4PM Details
  • CGHA Midget AA Girls vs Chinese National Olympic Hockey Team at the Garnet Rickard Arena, Pad A, on Sunday, December 1st at 3PM
  • Breakfast with Santa at the Newtonville Community Hall, 21 Church Lane, Newtonville, on Sunday December 1st from 9AM to noon.  For advance tickets contact newtonvillehall@hotmail.com  https://www.facebook.com/NewtonvilleHall
  • Tree Lighting Ceremony at the Ina Brown Parkette, Newtonville, on Sunday, November 30th at 6:30PM.  http://www.newtonville.ca/treelighting2013.php
  • 1st Annual Courtice Santa Claus Parade, on Sunday, December 1st starting at 10:30AM  http://www.cbot.ca/courticesantaclausparade
  • Clarington Community Christmas Party, at Clarington Beech Centre, 26 Beech Avenue, Bowmanville, on Sunday, December 1st from 1PM to 3PM  http://www.cbot.ca/christmas
  • “A Gift of Christmas” Christmas Show at the Newcastle Community Hall, Newcastle, on Sunday, December 1st from 10AM to 4PM https://www.facebook.com/pages/A-Gift-of-Art/335204821344.

Plan ahead for:

  • Letters to Santa, (for ages 3-5, registration required),10:30AM to 11:30AM at Clarington Public Library branches.  Tuesday, December 3rd at Bowmanville 905 623 7322;  Wednesday, December 4th at Newcastle 905 987 4844; and Thursday, December 5th at Courtice 905 404 0707.
  • T.H.E.E. 14th Annual Farmers Christmas Parade of Lights on Wednesday, December 4th, with an estimated time of arrival in Enniskillen of 6PM.  Here are last year’s details http://clarington.wordpress.com/2012/11/30/t-h-e-e-parade/.

Find us on Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/TourismClarington for more event info

Follow us on Twitter  https://twitter.com/clartourism #onlyinClarington

Or, download to our FREE Mobile App, and have all the details available as you travel around Clarington  http://m.clarington-tourism.ca

For more information on events in Clarington, please contact us at 1-855-779-1923, or tourism@clarington.net

Re-animating The Spirits of Historic Downtown

The Bowmanville Museum/photo by Nancy Ellis

Story by Nancy Ellis

An imprint is made on the mind when something happens – something sad, different or new – but what really creates a memory is something scary… scary fun! The ever popular, spirit walks hosted by the Clarington Museums and Archives can create that memory for you.

The tour takes place downtown Bowmanville and includes some downtown historic hot spots where ghosts might still resonate. The walks are lead by a costumed interpreter dressed in period clothing and are great for ghost hunters and legend lovers alike. Some people might be surprised to know that Bowmanville has not only rumours of ghosts but also stories about buried treasure, natural phenomena and strange happenings.  The spirit walks include reminiscences about the Alma Hotel from the 1800s and a story about bank robbers and a door handle that jiggles. Excited? Learn more about the haunted horse and carriage that trails through Bowmanville at night.

The walk begins outside the Bowmanville Museum at 37 Silver St. and continues downtown along sections of Church, King, Temperance, Scugog and Wellington Streets and is just under two kilometres. It’s mostly accessible save for the second floor of the museum where the tour is ended, but stories can be recounted in the parlor by request. During the spirit walk an anecdote is told about the wolves in Rotary Park, which is considered to be one of Bowmanville’s signature stories. The haunted law office, a mysterious run-down old hotel and a cemetery without gravestones are also featured on the walk.

There are also five ghosts rumoured to be in the Bowmanville Museum, from a short lady to pouting children and haunted furniture.

More legends are told during the walk and once you hear the stories, history truly comes alive! The spirit walks happen every Thursday at 7 p.m., starting Sept. 12 and run until Oct. 24 with a final walk on Wednesday Oct. 30. Admission is $7 and advance registration is necessary. Call the museum at 905-623-2734 for details.

While you’re in town why not have dinner at Maddy’s Pub or The Village Inn both located in Bowmanville within walking distance of the tour and maybe you’ll see a ghost! Both pubs are said to have their own ghosts who hang around, haunt and sometimes appear.

The Village Inn at 99 King St. W. is an old building that’s now a pub and restaurant, where ghosts are rumoured to linger.

Allegedly the ghostly happenings take place in the upstairs red room. Mysterious recounts by staff and patrons vary from moving objects to inconsistent radio signals. Other things have happened too, like missing gadgets and rearranged cutlery… pretty eerie. Could this be a ghost, a trickster or someone just having fun? If it’s a ghost, who is it and where did it come from? No specific rumours have surfaced but why not try to feel the ghostly presence yourself?

Click images to enlarge

Maddy’s Pub at 7 Division St. is one place that has a story. This old residential house built in the 1800s is home to a ghost… or is it?

As the tale goes most incidents happen once and do not reoccur, from appearances to unexplained movement. Allegedly the staff will hear a particular mysterious sound more often. They’ve heard what could only be explained as a person kicking at the side of the bar –a hard bang, bang, bang. Could this be a ghost inside the old house? If it is, what do they want?

Click images to enlarge

Many local residents believe this to be the spirit of Sybil Burk. Sybil would’ve lived in the house for a number of years, right up until it became a licensed establishment in the early 1970s.  The corner lot next door – which was the home of a church, a music hall, then an evaporator works for dried apples – later became John A. Holgate & Son Coal and Building Supply Company where Sybil worked. She was seen as a righteous woman who could’ve disapproved of alcohol, along with the rest of Bowmanville (for some time anyway.) In 1909 a local option was exercised and Bowmanville citizens voted against having alcohol in their town. Then that was it – no alcohol was allowed for sale or consumption until about the 1970s. The closest place to get drinks would’ve been in Newcastle.

It is said that this kicking at the bar could be Sybil kicking in protest of alcohol or as a reminder of her virtuous disposition.

Visit Maddy’s Pub after a spirit walk for a haunted drink special and wings. Ask owner Anne Sharp and the staff about the hauntings or discover the place yourself. Maddy’s has a friendly atmosphere and is a great place to sit and share stories and maybe even get scared. Please note Maddy’s has also been the host of the Beech Street Theatre Company … and theatres are often haunted.

‘Ghosts of Years Gone By’

Photos and Story by Clarington Tourism

If you have ever walked through an Ontario Provincial Park at dusk, just before the campfires are lit, you may have sensed something nostalgic that seems to stir up intrigue of settlers and pioneers past. Tales of ghosts seem to warrant telling at this twilight hour!

Darlington Provincial Park on the shores of Lake Ontario, had just that in store for us last night during their Annual “Ghosts of Years Gone By” Spirit Walk.

Along with 150  visiting guests, we enjoyed a beautiful August evening walk with Park staff, student interpreters in period costume, and perhaps some spirits of early founding residents to this area.

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Starting out east from the Log Cabin nestled along the shoreline of Lake Ontario, we followed the winding path to the beautiful outdoor Park Amphitheatre  

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Our Guide led us by lantern through a network of dirt and paved paths  throughout the Park’s four trails.   We were greeted rather spontaneously by a number of spirited  historical characters. Our first encounter was the 1794 loyalist settler Roger Conant, who was busy burying gold in Robinson Creek.

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As we bade our farewell to the Conant family and continued on our journey, even the lamp could not cast light on where we were headed next…

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We met a young settler girl along the way who enlightened us with tales of her daily pioneer chores.

Then, the striking sound of howling wolves moved us quickly along to the shelter of the log cabin!

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Inside we learned of early settler life for the Trull, Burk and Conant families.

These two generations of women were busy churning butter, grinding herbs and telling tales as they sat beside the fieldstone fireplace.

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With night falling and the sun setting low upon the beach, it cast an eerie pink glow as the mist rolled into the Bay

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The group travelled more tightly together now.  Young children bravely embraced the dark, but were cautioned by their teasing parents and grandparents to ‘watch for ghosts!’

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Part of the Park’s early Darlington history includes a small family cemetery; we were directed to it by flashlight

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Along the way we met some odd relics

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The crowd seemed to become more quiet the farther we travelled down the trail to the cemetery (even the parents!)

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Announcing their displeasure of our presence at their gravesite,  Samuel Burk and his wife Mary Van Camp gave account of their right to rest in peace!

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It was time to return to the Park store and bid farewell, when one last character appeared and met us with a blast! He was determined to protect us from ‘ravaging wolves’ and created quite a stir when he mistakenly directed his threat upon  some of our leashed pets.  After his self correction and then a wrestle with stuffed wolf, he ran off into the deep, dark forest.

After applause, we said goodnight to our new ‘old’ friends, and the children were happily off to bed at their campsite!

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THANKS TO ALL THE STAFF AND VOLUNTEERS AT DARLINGTON PROVINCIAL PARK FOR SUCH GREAT ENTERTAINMENT!

If you missed this evening of ghostly tales and are dying to attend a Spirit Walk, there are ghosts aplenty appearing in nearby Bowmanville  the month of October.  Join Clarington Museum and their  ghostly guides on Thursday evenings as they lead you across the museum grounds and through historic downtown Bowmanville sharing other worldly accounts from the town’s early history!

Or experience a cemetery walk in Bowmanville  on Sept 21st

Call 905.623.2734 to reserve or email info@claringtonmuseums.com 

Experience A ‘Field’ Trip To The Blueberry Patch

Photos and story by Clarington Tourism

There is something refreshing about a visit to Wilmot Orchards in Newcastle, Ontario. Perhaps it’s because the blueberries picked fresh off the bush are firm, juicy and full of healthy goodness. Or maybe it’s the stand alone, naturally blue food that makes being at the orchard feel like you’re attending a summer party. Everywhere you look is a salute to the unique shade of berry blue, and the understated simplicity of picking your own food.

Here is a slide show of our visit. We hope you and your family enjoy your own ‘field’ trip to Wilmot Orchards in August. For more local ideas pick up one of our Visitor Guides while at the orchard  and make it a day to remember in Clarington!

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Time spent ‘In the Hayfield’

Photos and story by Clarington Tourism

Normally in the Tourism Office when we use the term ‘Summer Frenzy’, ‘Canadian Summer’ or ‘Ontario Sunrise’, we are speaking of experiences in travel. However, here we are referring to just a few of the delightful daylily selections that are locally bred, grown and individually named according to their features and facets by We’re In The Hayfield Now Daylily Gardens in Orono, Ontario.

Annually in July, owner Henry Lorrain graciously opens the acerage for a 3-day weekend Daylily Festival where visitors can drop in to experience the peak bloom season, relax in a garden party like setting, and take time to smell the daylilies.

Our visit this past weekend was both a refreshing treat and an adventure as we strolled from daylily to daylily, discovering its individual name and unique style. Trying to chose a ‘favourite’ was like trying to select an ice cream flavour from 200; how can you choose just one?

You can visit the daylily gardens in person at 4704 Pollard Road, Orono from May 15 to August 31, Monday to Friday 9-6 PM as well as Saturday and Sunday 10-5 PM (or by chance or appt.). You can also ‘shop and ship’ online at hayfield.ca … but who has ever ordered ice cream online?

The ‘Human’ Ecology of a Community Garden

Story and photos by Clarington Tourism

If the study of human groups in relation to their physical and social environment is called ‘human ecology’, than The Bowmanville Community Garden at 181 Liberty St. S. is a perfect research subject!

Formally known as The Ecology Garden (est. 1989) this original garden required a new home last year. Through the effort of volunteers from Durham Organic Gardeners (a chapter of The Canadian Organic Growers) the garden was migrated three kilometres to the south, right to our backyard. This new location co-exists with the Tourism Information Centre. The property has now been expanded to include an organic community food garden. This all took root from the creative efforts of the Durham Organic Gardeners and made possible with land allotted by the Municipality of Clarington.

To prepare the land in time to host organic gardening enthusiasts for the 2013 spring planting season, it required a measure of true grit! We watched from our window as they came to clear the rocks, stake the fence and till the ground. Then there was the arrival of soil, Miller Compost and volunteers with tools and trucks before the first seedlings arrived on site! Dedicated members have diligently dug in, and transformed our backyard into something wonderful!

It is designed to be gardened collectively by interested residents. Gardeners can tend to their own plots on their own schedule. If you’re interested in learning more about the gardens or checking on the availability of a plot, contact Vincent Powers – thesprucetree@rogers.com (905-263-2944).

We are excited to watch this garden grow, but mostly we are impressed with the ‘human ecology’ of observing people come together for the experience, education and enjoyment of healthy community living.

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Get Outside!

Story and photos by Nancy Ellis

Find yourself busily rushing from screen to screen, iPad to computer to cellphone and back again? There’s not a whole lot of ways to avoid it these days. Almost everyone wants their copy of this or that emailed, up on social media and twittered out there – a.s.a.p.

            But what’s really out there? Outside the screen?  Maybe you’ve forgotten, with intent or by chance or maybe because having an online presence has become a big (if not all-consuming) part of our lives.

            In Clarington there are great conservation areas and trails where you can see some wildlife and enjoy being out in nature!

Get outside this summer and find a place where you can hike, bike, picnic and revel in sunshine! A place to splash in the new rubber boots you bought downtown. A place for kids. A place that presents opportunities for family snapshots, fishing or practising your own photography skills. Catch the serene moments that make life wonderful any day of the week. 

Experience

Stephen’s Gulch Conservation Area, just off Bethesda Road on Stephens Mill Road

Walk, hike, cycle, run or take your dog. This is a great forested trail to experience nice summer shade to keep cool. An area to study plants and learn about wildlife like frogs, slugs and ferns. It borders on Soper Creek and includes part of the Soper Creek Valley.  All dogs must be leashed and parking is available.

Samuel Wilmot Nature Area, get there from Cobbledick Road and Toronto Street

Hike, cycle, walk and get all the way to Quebec, if you want. This trail runs lakefront along Lake Ontario through the Port of Newcastle and has access to both Wilmot Marsh and Wilmot Creek shorelines. Benches, board maps and parking here.

Enniskillen Conservation Area, access off Holt Road

Walk, picnic and see the two ponds that are wildlife habitats. See some living creatures or hike. You might spot some turtles, fish, bugs and/or frogs here. Some of the boardwalk crosses the Bowmanville Creek. Washrooms and parking are available at this site.

More

There are bunch of other nature areas, trails and conservation sites in Clarington too. Find one close to your home or local to something that you like to visit. Check out Bowmanville Valley Trail, Soper Creek Trail, Bowmanville Harbour Area, Bowmanville Westside Marshes Conservation Area, Darlington Waterfront Trail, Darlington Provincial Park and Courtice Millennium Trail all in the west of Clarington. To the east you will find the Waterfront Trail. In Orono there is the Sidney Rutherford Trail and the Orono Crown Lands. To the northwest Long Sault Conservation Area and Oak Ridges Trail are found. And who can forget the Ganaraska Forest, south central Ontario’s largest forest

Come by or call the Tourism Office for a trail guide, cycling or fishing map that will come in handy!